Northanger Abbey (Barnes & Noble Classics) Read online





  Table of Contents

  From the Pages of Northanger Abbey

  Title Page

  Copyright Page

  Jane Austen

  The World of Jane Austen and Northanger Abbey

  Introduction

  Advertisement, by the Authoress, to Northanger Abbey.

  Volume 1

  CHAPTER I

  CHAPTER II

  CHAPTER III

  CHAPTER IV

  CHAPTER V

  CHAPTER VI

  CHAPTER VII

  CHAPTER VIII

  CHAPTER IX

  CHAPTER X

  CHAPTER XI

  CHAPTER XII

  CHAPTER XIII

  CHAPTER XIV

  CHAPTER XV

  Volume 2

  CHAPTER XVI

  CHAPTER XVII

  CHAPTER XVIII

  CHAPTER XIX

  CHAPTER XX

  CHAPTER XXI

  CHAPTER XXII

  CHAPTER XXIII

  CHAPTER XXIV

  CHAPTER XXV

  CHAPTER XXVI

  CHAPTER XXVII

  CHAPTER XXVIII

  CHAPTER XXIX

  CHAPTER XXX

  CHAPTER XXXI

  Endnotes

  An Inspiration for Northanger Abbey

  Comments & Questions

  For Further Reading

  From the Pages of

  Northanger Abbey

  No one who had ever seen Catherine Morland in her infancy, would have supposed her born to be an heroine. (page 7)

  Provided that nothing like useful knowledge could be gained from them, provided they were all story and no reflection, she had never any objection to books at all. (page 9)

  "In every power, of which taste is the foundation, excellence is pretty fairly divided between the sexes." (page 22)

  No young lady can be justified in falling in love before the gentleman's love is declared, it must be very improper that a young lady should dream of a gentleman before the gentleman is first known to have dreamt of her. (page 24)

  Friendship is certainly the finest balm for the pangs of disappointed love. (page 27)

  Man only can be aware of the insensibility of man towards a new gown. (page 68)

  Woman is fine for her own satisfaction alone. No man will admire her the more, no woman will like her the better for it. Neatness and fashion are enough for the former, and a something of shabbiness or impropriety will be most endearing to the latter. (page 68)

  "The person, be it gentleman or lady, who has not pleasure in a good novel, must be intolerably stupid." (page 99)

  A woman especially, if she have the misfortune of knowing any thing, should conceal it as well as she can. (page 104)

  From politics, it was an easy step to silence. (page 105)

  "Miss Morland, no one can think more highly of the understanding of women than I do. In my opinion, nature has given them so much, that they never find it necessary to use more than half." (page 107)

  "I cannot speak well enough to be unintelligible." (page 124)

  "We can tempt you neither by amusement nor splendour, for our mode of living, as you see, is plain and unpretending; yet no endeavours shall be wanting on our side to make Northanger Abbey not wholly disagreeable." (page 130)

  "You must be aware that when a young lady is (by whatever means) introduced into a dwelling of this kind, she is always lodged apart from the rest of the family. While they snugly repair to their own end of the house, she is formally conducted by Dorothy the ancient housekeeper up a different staircase, and along many gloomy passages, into an apartment never used since some cousin or kin died in it about twenty years before. Can you stand such a ceremony as this? Will not your mind misgive you, when you find yourself in this gloomy chamber--too lofty and extensive for you, with only the feeble rays of a single lamp to take in its size--its walls hung with tapestry exhibiting figures as large as life, and the bed, of dark green stuff or purple velvet, presenting even a funereal appearance. Will not your heart sink within you?" (page 148)

  "Does our education prepare us for such atrocities?" (page 186)

  Published by Barnes & Noble Books

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  New York, NY 10011

  www.barnesandnoble.com/classics

  Northanger Abbey was published posthumously along with

  Persuasion in 1818.

  Published in 2005 by Barnes & Noble Classics with new

  Introduction, Notes, Biography, Chronology, An Inspiration For,

  Comments & Questions, and For Further Reading.

  Introduction, Notes, and For Further Reading

  Copyright @ 2005 by Alfred Mac Adam.

  Note on Jane Austen, The World of Jane Austen and

  Northanger Abbey, An Inspiration for Northanger Abbey, and

  Comments & Questions

  Copyright (c) 2005 by Barnes & Noble, Inc.

  All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced

  or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic or

  mechanical, including photocopy, recording, or any information

  storage and retrieval system, without the prior written permission

  of the publisher.

  Barnes & Noble Classics and the Barnes & Noble Classics

  colophon are trademarks of Barnes & Noble, Inc.

  Northanger Abbey

  ISBN-13: 978-1-59308-264-2 ISBN-10: 1-59308-264-9

  eISBN : 978-1-41143279-6

  LC Control Number 2004112102

  Produced and published in conjunction with:

  Fine Creative Media, Inc.

  322 Eighth Avenue

  New York, NY 10001

  Michael J. Fine, President and Publisher

  Printed in the United States of America

  QM

  7 9 10 8

  Jane Austen

  The English novelist Jane Austen was born on December 16, 1775, the seventh of eight children, in the Parsonage House of Steventon, Hampshire, where she spent her first twenty-five years. During her relatively brief lifetime Austen witnessed political unrest, revolution, war, and industrialization, yet these momentous events are not the central or explicit subjects of her finely focused novels. Rather, Austen wrote out of her immediate experience: the world of the country gentry and middle-class professional and business families. Jane's father, the Reverend George Austen, was the well-read country rector of Steventon and her mother, Cassandra (nee Leigh), was descended from a well-connected line of learned clergymen. By no means wealthy, the Austens nonetheless enjoyed a comfortable and socially respectable life.

  Jane and her beloved elder (and only) sister, Cassandra, were schooled in Southampton and Reading for short periods, but most of their education took place at home. Private theatrical performances in the barn at Steventon complemented Jane's studies of French, Italian, history, music, and eighteenth-century fiction. An avid reader from earliest childhood, she began writing at age twelve, no doubt encouraged by her highly literate and affectionate family. Indeed, family and writing were her great loves. Despite a momentary engagement in 1802, Jane Austen never married. Her first two extended narratives, "Elinor and Marianne" and "First Impressions," were written while she was at Steventon but were never published in their original form.

  Following her father's retirement, Jane moved in 1801 with her parents and sister to Bath. That popular watering hole, removed from the country life Jane preferred, presented the observant young writer with a wealth of events and experiences that would later be put to good use in her novels. Austen moved to Southampton with her mother and sister after the death of her father in